Symphony infographics

How the Toronto Symphony Orchestra uses graphic design to guide its audiences though its music

I love the clarity of the infographics, and think they’re a great way to map a piece of music. However, I wonder if they would change my listening experience as much as I think they would. When I go to the BSO, I usually browse the program before the concert starts, or at intermission — never during the actual concert, because riffling through pages feels rude to me. These notes feel more like a sports announcer or tour guide — informative, but meant to be experienced simultaneously with a performance instead of something to reflect on before or afterwards.

Miss Manhattan, or the anonymity of ubiquity

I’ve been a fan of the 99% Invisible podcast for a long time, but their recent Miss Manhattan episode really knocked it out of the park. I knew in the abstract sense that statuary is often based on real models, of course, but I had never really considered what it would feel like to look up at a thing made of marble, or bronze, or any other material that will last many more years than a single human lifespan, and see your own face. And in Audrey Munson’s case, at least, to be ubiquitous yet forgotten.