War, Pestilence, Famine, Death, and Twine

I originally wrote this post for StoryCade.

There’s something unusual about the announcement of this year’s XYZZY Awards finalists. For the first time since since Inform 7 was released in 2006, most of the XYZZY Awards finalists were not created with it. In fact, this is the first time in the entire seventeen-year history of the XYZZY Awards that the plurality of nominees were not created with some version of Inform.

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Parsers and prejudice

I originally wrote this post for spectaclerock.com.

Something of a furor has erupted over some brash comments by Jonathan Blow in an interview with PC Gamer:

Adventure games are all confusion. If it’s text, it’s “Why doesn’t the parser understand me still?” So the core gameplay of adventure games is actually fumbling through something, right? And that’s true with modern [versions]. All the episodic stuff that’s coming out. And there’s a whole community that makes modern interactive fiction games and all this stuff. And it’s true for all these games.

He touches a nerve in the modern-day IF community. Bad parsers are what the heyday of interactive fiction is remembered for among mainstream gamers. Homestar Runner parodied this in Thy Dungeonman; lingering in the shadow of the first major East Coast IF meetup in years at PAX East was Action Castle, a live rendition of a text adventure which relished in classically hackneyed phrasings like “You see a thing here,” “Exits are west, east, and in,” and whose moderator gleefully retorted “I don’t know how to do that” or “You see no [whatever] here” whenever a player said a sentence more complicated than what a dog could comprehend. These parodies were affectionate, of course, but illustrative of a problem the IF community has struggled with since players first found themselves standing west of a white house with a small mailbox nearby. It’s not like that anymore.

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